For the Love of Gardening  

What works & What doesn't...


MARCH


“When I went out, the sun was hot

It shone upon my flower pot.

And there I saw a spike of green

That no one else had ever seen.

On other days, the things I see

Are mostly old except for me.

But this green spike, so new and small

Had never yet been seen at all.”

Barbara Baker 


Although the days are getting longer and they are warming up some, this is NOT the time to dig in your garden especially if you live in Canadian in zones 6 or lower…. (USDA zones 7 or below)

If you are like me, I am itching to get into the garden, and my rubber boots are at the door. 

But walking on your garden now, will compact the soil that you have been nurturing for a few seasons.  Digging in it right now, will also compact the soil. 


If you must get into your garden to prune what does need to be pruned, then lay down boards to walk on.  This spreads your weight over a larger area and prevents a lot of the compaction.


DO prune your fruit trees: more on that after I attend a fruit tree pruning workshop.


PLEASE DO NOT prune your roses… wait until the Forsythia blooms… 


DO prune your Hydrangeas now…. and there are many on-line videos that show you how if you have never done it. The easiest basic is pruning back to the 2 lowest buds on each branch as well as getting rid of all the twiggy bits.  Those wee branches that look like sticks, are not strong enough to bear flowers and will only break and put the bush in danger of attracting disease or insects in the broken parts.

Otherwise, be patient; watch for Snowdrops and Crocus if you planted them, and if not, look for them in your neighbour’s garden. 


DON’T yet prune Caryopteris, Butterfly or Lavender yet… wait till after the last frost and when you see a bit of budding. 


Otherwise, be patient; watch for Snowdrops and Crocus if you planted them, and if not, look for them in your neighbour’s garden. 


LEAVE  the soil hilled up around your roses  until you are quite sure there will be no more frost.


What date did you first see a Robin?

What date did you first sleep with your window open?

This is a month of firsts. 


Go to PlantWatch.com and sign in to let them know the first time you see one of their listed plants.  Doing so, registers the first bloom of many plants and that data helps to determine the effects of climate change… read more here www.naturewatch.ca


Love the smell of the earth, the sound of birds singing their hearts out and that feeling that things are new…feel the sun on your face (free Vitamin D) and know that all things are new now and we can start over…  the darkness of winter  has ended and hope for life in the garden is renewed.

MONTHS

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